May 10, 2019

New Notary Law Potentially Bringing Changes to Commission Process

If you haven’t gotten your notary commission, now is a good time to do so since the Secretary of State is considering some rules changes to the current notary public application process.

Under the current rules, the traditional new notary application requires the individual to submit an application, take a one-hour long class, submit to a background check and successfully pass the notary public test. The proposed rule changes would require new applicants to do all of the above, but the class would be three hours long and the application would need to be submitted to the Secretary of State electronically.

Currently, new attorney notary applicants do not need to take a class or a test to become a notary public. The only requirement is submitting an application, along with an $80 application fee, and then the attorney will have a lifetime commission. Under the proposed rules, attorneys who want to obtain their notary commission will have to take a three-hour education course prior to receiving their commission (although they will not have to take a test or submit to a background check). It will still be a lifetime commission.

The new notary law has not passed yet, so this content may be subject to change. It will be open for comments until May 15. If you are interested in becoming a notary public (attorneys and the general public), the Columbus Bar Association recommends that you do so before July 31 to ensure that the proposed rule changes do not apply to you. Click here to learn more about the process to become a notary (under the current rules).

If you are interested in becoming a notary public (attorneys and the general public), the CBA recommends that you do so before July 31 to ensure that the proposed rule changes do not apply to you.